Share the Rich History and Culture of Spain by Giving Bullfighting Gifts

Bullfighting is considered a Spanish iconic tradition and defines their Iberian cultural characteristics. Many deplore this tradition due to its brutality while adored by others for its artistic content. Bullfighting is a bloody and violent spectacle which was described in Ernest Hemingway’s novel “A Sun Also Rises” which caught the attention of the Western world. It is still a curious attraction to many travelers who visit Spain even if there’s an ongoing dispute between moralists and bullfighting enthusiasts.

The first bullfighting in Spain was held in honor of King Alfonso VIII’s coronation in 711 A.D., known as “corrida de toros”.  Spain was part of the Roman Empire and this tradition is part of the gladiator games where it was done while on horseback and only reserved for the Spanish aristocracy. King Felipe ended the trend with the belief that it was such a poor taste for nobles to practice a bloody sport.

The commoners continued to develop bullfighting using smaller weapons without the use of horses, and the art of dodging and stabbing the bull had grown to its present form since 1724. The Matadors had clung to the developed strict code of conduct for their performances in Madrid, Seville, and Pamplona where they have a rich bullfighting legacy and the largest bullfighting rings in the world.

The bullfighting season in Spain lasts from March to October, that’s spring through autumn, and Sundays are typically the biggest days. There are three types of tickets sold; “Sol” tickets are the cheapest since the seats are under the sun, “Sol y Sombra” tickets for combined sun and shade seats for the mid-range price, and “Sombra” tickets are considered the most expensive for shaded seats.

The bullfights start with the opening parade, then the cape stage where the matador tests the bull’s strength, then the Picador stage where bullfighters on horseback taunt the bull by stabbing it on its shoulders followed by the banderilleros who rushed the bull on foot while tossing colored darts on its back. The killing stage wraps up the fight with the matador using a little red cape and plunging a long sword into the back of weak and tired bull as it makes its final lunge at its tormentor. A matador earns more respect for making a clean kill. A bullfight normally takes about 3 to 4 hours.

Travelers, tourists, and visitors who come to Spain and had witnessed bullfighting will enjoy giving souvenirs and regalos taurinos to their family and friends at home, who weren’t able to enjoy part of Spanish history. AlCoso is an online taurina shop who offers different items with bullfighting themes such as key chains, bracelets, handbags, custom jewelry, and more. Get a taste of the Jesus Blasco pez wine uniquely bottled in goat’s skin and latex boots.

A gift of taurino paintings will be greatly appreciated by friends and family who loved paintings. A grandson will surely enjoy the gift of a matador garb or a matador toy sword. For additional information and orders send an email to info@alcoso.es, where orders can be delivered within 24 to 48 hours within Spain and anywhere in the world through confirmation.